Categories

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I think my shirts have shrunk, How do I know for sure?

The industry allows for a normal shrinkage of two percent. Shrinkage beyond this is due to poorly stabilized materials. To be sure, measure the collar and sleeve length. Measure the collar from the beginning of the button hole to the center of the button. Measure the sleeve length in a straight line from the center of the back of the collar to the end of the cuff. If these measurements correspond to the shirt size, it has not shrunk.

What causes the “puckering” of fabric in collar and cuffs?

This is caused by excessive shrinking of the interfacing within the collar and cuff. This is a manufacturing issue, because the manufacturer must select an interlacing which can withstand the normal laundry process.

“But it wasn’t stained when I brought it in”

Some stains caused by beverages, food, or oily substances may not be visible after they dry. But later, with exposure to heat or simply the passage of time, a yellow or brownish stain will appear. This is the end result of oxidation or caramelization of sugar or sweetening agents. It is the same process that makes a peeled apple turn brown after exposure to air. If we don’t know about it we can’t fix it, so let us know if you spilled something.

How often should I clean my linens and comforters?

Any item that is in direct or constant contact with your skin and body, like bed sheets, should be cleaned weekly. For items like a comforter, which normally do not have constant contact with your skin or body, should be cleaned at least once a month. This will help keep your items clean from Allergens, dust, bed bugs, dirt, soil and pet hair.

How long can I expect a shirt to last?

The best way to gauge the life expectancy of a shirt is by how many times it has been cleaned. Therefore the average life of a shirt is 35 to 50 washings. This can also vary depending on the amount of abrasions during normal wear, fiber content, fabric type and which type of starch is used. For example, if you get your shirts cleaned weekly, expect them to last around a year.

Why do shirt buttons crack or break as often as they do?

Buttons may crack during the pressing process, even though the padding of the pressing machine being in excellent condition. The majority of buttons are made from a polyester resin. The strength of each button depends on the amount of polyester in the resin. Some manufacturers use off-quality buttons to save money and the result is a higher number of broken buttons. We try our best to inspect garments for broken buttons to be replaced.

My Husband has some 100% cotton oxford shirts that have some tiny holes here and there. What is causing these holes to develop?

The Oxford weave consists of two, thin warp yarns to every soft, thicker yarn in the filling direction. The unbalanced construction causes the thin yarns to break, leaving tiny holes. Manufactures could use a high twist in the yarn to retard the development of holes, but eventually any Oxford weave will develop tiny pinholes. Constant abrasion during normal wear causes only the thin yarns to weaken and tear.

How do I find the address to the manufacturer?

On the care label, there is a set of numbers proceeded with ‘RN’ . A registered identification number (RN) is issued by the FTC to businesses residing in the U.S. The RN number is helpful for consumers when trying to contact a manufacturer with a question, comment or complaint. You can access and search the FTC data base on their web site.

Why is it so important to have a Care Label?

For starters, the care label has a lot of pertinent information on it. The label has the garments size, where it is made, type of fabric, style number, RN number and care instructions. Care labels help everyone who handles the cleaning of garments know how to safely clean it. The Federal Trade Commission ( FTC ) requires that manufacturers attach a permanent care label to textile garments to provide directions for their care. Manufacturers must list at least one method of safe care for a garment. The rule also stipulates that the care label is easily found, will not separate from the garment, and will remain legible for the garment’s useful life. It also must warn when there is no method for cleaning a garment without damaging it. If you or the cleaner followed the care label and damage to the garment happens, it is the responsibility of the manufacturer. You should return the garment to the store and explain ( With the help of your cleaner if needed) what happened. If the store will not resolve the problem, write to the manufacturer and send a copy of your complaint letter to the FTC. The information you provide the FTC may reveal a pattern or practice requiring the Commission’s attention. If you purchase a garment with no care label, you should contact the FTC, giving the name and address of the store and manufacturer.

Are all clothes cleaned on the premises?

Yes. All the clothes are cleaned and pressed at this location.

What is Laundering?

Special detergents, additives and finishes sets commercial laundering from home laundering. This process enables your cleaner to offer consistent quality shirts at reasonable prices.

What is Wet Cleaning?

Wet Cleaning is the process of removing soil and stains from fabric by using water and additives (such as detergent).

The industry allows for a normal shrinkage of two percent.  Shrinkage beyond this is due to poorly stabilized materials.  To be sure, measure the collar and sleeve length.  Measure the collar from the beginning of the button hole to the center of the button.  Measure the sleeve length in a straight line from the center of the back of the collar to the end of the cuff.  If these measurements correspond to the shirt size, it has not shrunk.

This is caused by excessive shrinking of the interfacing within the collar and cuff.  This is a manufacturing issue, because the manufacturer must select an interlacing which can withstand the normal laundry process.

Some stains caused by beverages, food, or oily substances may not be visible after they dry. But later, with exposure to heat or simply the passage of time, a yellow or brownish stain will appear. This is the end result of oxidation or caramelization of sugar or sweetening agents. It is the same process that makes a peeled apple turn brown after exposure to air. If we don’t know about it we can’t fix it, so let us know if you spilled something.

Any item that is in direct or constant contact with your skin and body, like bed sheets,  should be cleaned weekly.  For items like a comforter, which normally do not have constant contact with your skin or body, should be cleaned at least once a month.  This will help keep your items clean from Allergens, dust, bed bugs, dirt, soil and pet hair.

The best way to gauge the life expectancy of a shirt is by how many times it has been cleaned.  Therefore the average life of a shirt is 35 to 50 washings.  This can also vary depending  on the amount of abrasions during normal wear, fiber content, fabric type and which type of starch is used. For example, if you get your shirts cleaned weekly, expect them to last around a year.

Buttons may crack during the pressing process, even though the padding of the pressing machine being in excellent condition.  The majority of buttons are made from a  polyester resin.  The strength of each button depends on the amount of polyester in the resin.  Some manufacturers use off-quality buttons to save money and the result is  a higher number of broken buttons.  We try our best to inspect garments for broken buttons to be replaced.

The Oxford weave consists of two, thin warp yarns to  every soft, thicker yarn in the filling direction.  The unbalanced construction causes the thin yarns to break, leaving tiny holes.  Manufactures could use a high twist in the yarn to retard the development of holes, but eventually any Oxford weave will develop tiny pinholes.  Constant abrasion during normal wear causes only the thin yarns to weaken and tear.

On the care label, there is a set of numbers proceeded with ‘RN’ .  A registered identification number (RN) is issued by the FTC to businesses residing in the U.S.  The RN number is helpful for consumers when trying to contact a manufacturer with a question, comment or complaint.  You can access and search the FTC data base on their web site.

For starters, the care label has a lot of pertinent information on it.   The label has the garments size, where it is made, type of fabric, style number, RN number and care instructions.  Care labels help everyone who handles the cleaning of garments know how to safely clean it.  The Federal Trade Commission ( FTC ) requires that manufacturers attach a permanent care label to textile garments to provide directions for their care.  Manufacturers must list at least one method of safe care for a garment.   The rule also stipulates that the care label is easily found, will not separate from the garment, and will remain legible for the garment’s useful life.  It also must warn when there is no method for cleaning a garment without damaging it.  If you or the cleaner followed the care label and damage to the garment happens, it is the responsibility of the manufacturer.  You should return the garment to the store and explain ( With the help of your cleaner if needed) what happened.  If the store will not resolve the problem, write to the manufacturer and send a copy of your complaint letter to the FTC.  The information you provide the FTC may reveal a pattern or practice requiring the Commission’s attention.  If you purchase a garment with no care label, you should contact the FTC, giving the name and address of the store and manufacturer.

Yes.  All the clothes are cleaned and pressed at this location.

Special detergents, additives and finishes sets commercial laundering from home laundering.  This process enables your cleaner to offer consistent quality shirts at reasonable prices.

Wet Cleaning is the process of removing soil and stains from fabric by using water and additives (such as detergent).